tag: eggs

Posted by in lifestyle

last week, i was so excited to have my dear friend katie daisy and her country-folk-singing-beau, luke redfield, come stay with us. they were able to take a quick break from their road trip around the country to swing by our humble abode and rest for a bit.

for those of you who might not be familiar with katie’s work, you should hop over and take a glance at it before reading the rest of this post. she’s not only the most talented artist i know, but her work represents a much bigger purpose. beneath the fluttering butterflies and spring colors lies a deeper meaning. each piece overflows with katie’s beautiful soul and longing to make the world a more joyful place. her work is heartfelt, stunningly beautiful and an inspiration to so many people!

much like her artwork, katie is full of life, energy and good vibes. she is ever so kind, lovely and intentional with her day to day life. i am so blessed to have her as a friend, and as i know many of you enjoy her work, i thought you might like to take a glimpse into the few days we spent together!

frolicking with katie dasiy

along with our many adventures of visiting the farmer’s market, walking amongst the lavender fields and feeding the ostriches (say, what?) we of course took some time to paint!

frolicking with katie dasiy

frolicking with katie dasiy

frolicking with katie dasiy

frolicking with katie dasiy

we stayed up late (really late) a few nights and painted together. i’m no expert so i enjoyed watching katie’s process and tried to soak up every little detail along the way. can you guess which side of the table i was painting on? :)

frolicking with katie dasiy

i especially enjoyed watching katie prep some art for a new project she’s working on. she looks pretty good at my computer, right? i’m thinking she should just move in..

frolicking with katie dasiy

and perhaps our favorite moment? when we realized we’re going to have to start collecting sunglasses to use as camera filters. (can you see me in the reflection? click on the picture to make it bigger!)

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Posted by in simple living

most of you know that i keep a small flock of backyard chickens (you can meet them here and here) and today i want to discuss the basics of why chickens are great to have and how you go about doing it.  i know some of you are just dying to eat fresh eggs every morning, right?!

how to start a backyard flock

{photo: my pet chicken}

let’s talk about the not-so-fun part first (skip down if you’re not into gruesome details).  this is a hard subject to swallow, but one we all need to become much more educated on.  unfortunately, industry standards for producing (any kind of) meat aren’t sustainable, nice or fun to learn about. the farming industry is pushed to increase revenue and decrease time so hard that the result is unhealthy, unhappy animals.  chickens are generally kept in cages in a factory building with no windows.  kept in such close quarters and breathing nothing but fecal dust, the farmer’s are forced to feed them antibiotics to keep them from getting sick.  growth hormones are added to their food in order to increase egg production, or in the case of meat birds, increase their breast size.  sadly, many of these bird’s breasts get so large that they can’t remain standing, and topple over from the wait instead.  egg layers kept in cages stacked on one another get feces dropped on them from the birds above and often times they’re feet actually grown around the wire cage from inadequate room to move.  we end up eating the growth hormones and antibiotics that are present in the meat and it in turn effects our health.  due to added hormones, girls and boys are hitting puberty earlier than ever and we’re as a population becoming less immune to antibiotics as they are being found in any meat we eat that’s not organic.  these hormones and antibiotics have many more ramifications but one of the largest is that it ends up in our breast milk which we feed our newborns.  so without going into too much more detail: after learning about the incredibly unhappy animals and destruction to our environment caused from industry farming, the antibiotics and the hormones, i decided to raise my own chickens (and ultimately become a vegetarian).  i truly believe we are what we eat, and i don’t want to eat added nasties in my food or consume animals that were never happy or ever saw the light of day. if you’re interested in learning more, my favorite book about it all is called veggie revolution.

how to start a backyard flock

{farm fresh eggs}

now- onto more pleasant subjects!! there’s a lot to learn about keeping hens, but the good news is that after researching lots of hobby farm animals, chickens win for the easiest and most fun animal to keep. so let’s start off with the basics: why would you want chickens?  in addition to the above reasons: chickens don’t take up much land, are excellent for your garden and fertilizer, drastically reduce the number of ticks and other icky insects in your yard, are easy keepers, hilarious to watch and give you yummy eggs every day.  a recent article from mother earth news shows that eggs raised on the farm have:

• 1⁄3 less cholesterol
• 1⁄4 less saturated fat
• 2⁄3 more vitamin A
• 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
• 3 times more vitamin E
• 7 times more beta carotene

and, i feed mine organic feed which means i have organic eggs at my disposal all the time! we stick to using our hens for eggs, but raising chickens for meat is another fantastic way to eat sustainable, local meat and say no to harmful industry standards.

how to start a backyard flock

my chicks the day they arrived

now that you now the why, we can move onto the how!  more and more cities are now allowing you to keep chickens within city limits.  check with your city or see chicken laws to see if your’s applies.  getting and raising chickens are easy.  my hands-down favorite place to order chicks is from my pet chicken.  with a minimum order of 3 (count them, 3!) chicks, you can pick and choose which breeds you like.  they’re shipped out the day they hatch and arrive within a few days, all healthy and ready to meet ‘mommy’! all you need is a warm place to put them (i use a cardboard box), a waterer and a feeder.  they’ll be big enough within about 5 weeks to be moved to a coop and soon they’ll be running around your yard!  my pet chicken’s free e-care book has all the information you need about getting and rearing baby chicks, so i’m going to send you there for all the nitty gritties (but it’s easy, i promise!).

how to start a backyard flock

{chicken and the egg}

what kind of chickens are right for you? there are many different kinds and reasons people want chicks.  some are for show, some are just fun to look at.  some are colorful egg layers and some are only for meat.  i picked mine on temperament (i wanted them to be sweet and not too ‘flighty’) and egg production.  between my pet chicken’s breed list and henderson’s handy dandy chicken chart- i had a list of fav’s in no time.

how to start a backyard flock

{silkie chicken}

where will you put them? in the first few weeks they’ll need to be somewhere that you can check in on them numerous times a day.  i usually keep mine in the kitchen for a few weeks, then move them out into a heated barn, garage or extra room.  after they’ve gotten big enough (about 5 weeks), you can move them to a coop.  i’ve seen just about anything work, from a big walk-in coop to an old broken down car!  anything that protects them from the weather and other wildlife (think snakes, cats and wolves) will suffice.  you’ll need to be able to securely close them up at night and let them out in the morning.  the setup should be very easy- they’ll need a pole to roost on at night, one nesting box per 4 birds to lay their eggs in and a feeder and waterer.  if you live in the city or a close knit neighborhood, you’ll want to keep them in a fenced in area, yard or run, and if you live on acreage you can let them roam free!

how to start a backyard flock

{photo: my pet chicken}

some misconceptions:

- chickens smell. they don’t smell at all!  as long as you keep a clean, dry coop all you’ll get is a whiff of cedar shavings.

- chickens are loud. my girls hardly make a peep.  sometimes in the morning they’ll squawk as they lay an egg but generally my neighbors can’t hear anything.

- you need a rooster. chickens don’t need a rooster to lay eggs!  in fact, no industry egg from the grocery store has ever been fertilized.  the only reason you need a rooster is if you want your eggs to hatch. (and roosters are where the noise comes from)!

- different colored eggs taste differently. i have blue, green, white, beige and dark brown eggs and they all taste the same!  egg color is a result of the color of calcium build up they have in their bodies, that’s all!

- chickens are stupid. sorry, mine are smart. i promise.

- chicken’s and kids don’t mix. they do! hens are sweet, don’t peck and can be great teachers to young kids about where food comes from.  i’ve seen many kids gathering eggs and carrying their hens around the yard!

how to start a backyard flock

my day old chicks

my favorite resources:

- FRESH the movie – a feel good short trailer on farming practices – it’s so good!

- veggie revolution - about industry farming practices

the femivore movement – my fav article on chicks with chicks

my pet chicken’s free e-care book- a MUST read if you’re considering buying chicks!

living with chickens – a beautiful and very informative read on rearing chickens

this is a big subject with lots to discuss, i’ll meet you in the comment section to answer any questions or for further discussion! love, bonnie

simple living

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Posted by in handmade

happy friday lovelies!  today marks the first recipe in our summer series, yeah! summer recipes are always the easiest, just about everything grows in the beautiful warmth of summer!  today’s recipe is easy, beautiful and delicious. i like to call it ‘pepper hole eggs’.

pepper hole eggs

ingredients:

– 1 large sweet pepper (i used local purple heirlooms peppers here, but any kind will work)

– 3 eggs, local eggs are always easy to find!

– 1 tbs of butter

– salt and pepper to taste

summer recipes :: bell pepper

directions:

slice your pepper sideways to create hollow rings about 1/3″ thick.  let your butter melt in a skillet over medium heat.  once butter has melted, place your pepper rings in a single layer in the pan.  crack one egg in each pepper hole.  depending on whether you like your eggs over easy, medium or hard you can remove them from the pan or flip them accordingly.  for over hard, let cook until the yellows are slightly firm then flip with a spatula.  let them cook a few more minutes, sprinkle with salt and pepper and serve.

these are delicious by themselves, over salads or as an easy meat replacement for dinner.  you can even sprinkle a little parmesan cheese over them to bring out a new rich flavor, enjoy!

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diy ornithology clock

June 18, 2010

diy ornithology clock

diy ornithology clock

when i ran across this diy ornithology clock on design*sponge, i about fell out of my chair! i think this clock was destined for me.  so simple, i thought, “why didn’t i think of that?”  the tutorial comes from kate pruitt who is a regular diy contributor on d*s.  not only is this version of eggs and feathers near perfection, but think of all the possibilities for different varieties!  make sure to share with us your results if you decide to get crafty!

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Posted by in simple living

hi lovelies! today, i am honored to introduce to do you the newest members of our family!

baby chicks

my little box of 7 healthy peeping chicks (all girls) arrived at the post office yesterday from my pet chicken!

baby chicks

“well hello, sista!”

baby chicks

this is paulie the buff laced polish – her fluffy head will turn into a big tuft of feathers one day, you can what she’ll look like here!

baby chicks

this is pearl the plymouth rock- she’ll be especially friendly.

baby chicks

say hello to clover the blue cochin! do you see her feathered feet? she’ll have beautiful feathered legs when she grows up.

baby chicks

this is joby the jersey giant- jersey giants are good natured and supersized!

baby chicks

meet olina the orpington! i already have one orpington (odessa) and she’s the smartest chicken i’ve ever met (i promise!) so i couldn’t say no to getting another one.

baby chicks

elloise the easter egger will one day give me beautiful blue eggs.

baby chicks

this here is daisy the dominique, her breed is endangered so i’m doing what i can to keep their name alive!

baby chicks

these next few shots are of elloise and paulie, they are so cute together!

baby chicks

baby chicks

her beautiful eyes take my breath away.  i’m such a proud momma!  they are all in my kitchen for the next week or so, then i’ll move them to the laundry room before they make their way to the outside coop where they’ll meet my other 7 hens!

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Posted by in Uncategorized

good morning monday!  how was your weekend?  mine was a great one full of sunshine and house cleaning (how fun!).  today is the mister’s birthday, so i’ve got a bit of planning and wrapping presents to do today- he’s turning 25!

do you remember the baby robin’s eggs i had in my garden?  well, they hatched and i’ve been able to take pictures of them as they’ve grown and i’m a little sad to say that they’ve flown the coop!  i guess i should have known that was coming.  i couldn’t believe my eyes of how much they had grown every day! here’s a summary of their progression:

robin's eggs to birds

aren’t they darling? all four hatched and survived, due to the mother’s highly protective care (and i mean highly!).

bird nest

these little birdies (not sure what kind?) were in a bird house i have, and i love this ‘surprised’ pic i got of them!  i peeked in on them one day when they were little and found a nest of fire ants all over them , so with a little diatomaceous earth (food grade, very safe) i dusted around the nest and like to think that i saved their little lives!  they’ve flown the coop as well, so it’s all empty nest syndrome here!

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Posted by in handmade

has friday come once again?  did you have a good week?  i had so much fun chatting with you and talking about projects and the like. :)  i’ll be back in a little bit with some news for next week, so stay tuned!

working

clockwise: wittle wabbit planter, robin eggs – set of 6 wooden, little bunny princewooden eggs, happy easter letterpress flat card, DIGITAL FILE easter gift tags

i hope each of you have a wonderful and relaxing easter weekend!  what will you be doing this weekend?  do you have any family traditions?  though easter bunnies, egg hunts and little chickens are gloriously fun, try to reflect on the real meaning of easter as well, it’s one of my favorite holidays!

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come on green thumb!

April 2, 2009

Posted by in Uncategorized

with easter just around the corner, my mind has been on eggs. it’s also been on gardening, since this year i’m making my very first attempt at a veggie garden (come on green thumb!), so i thought, why not combine the two? i figured you could start seedlings indoors in eggshells, then just transplant the whole thing right into the ground when they’re ready! biodegradable, easy, fun, eco-friendly! here’s how:1) pick out your best and biggest eggs!

egg-collage

2) remove the top of the eggshell, a hole about the size of a quarter. I used a knife for this, and it worked great! don’t fret- the shells are a bit tougher than you think.

3) remove the top of the shell and if your not cooking at the moment, make sure you save your eggs for those yummy omelets in the morning…

poke-the-hole

4) using a needle or a pin, poke a hole in the bottom of the shell to allow for water drainage.

fill-with-soil

5) fill each shell with organic seed starter mix and lightly moisten the soil. you can also label each shell with a pen or pencil- so you don’t forget what you planted! add 1-2 seeds per shell and cover them lightly with more soil (read individual seed packets for specifics).

under-the-grow-light

6) you’re done! place them in a sunny window or under a glow bulb and wait for them to sprout- that’s the best part:) keep the soil moist but not soaked. when it’s time to transplant them outside, all you have to do is crack the shell and place the whole thing in the ground.

i was able to use eggs from my hens, but you can use any eggs you have in the fridge. wouldn’t these be really great easter gifts? an already-sprouted herb garden!

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